Endometrial dating histology public dating profiles

16-Jan-2020 00:13

Patient age was not correlated with the incidence of abnormalities in integrin expression.

Conclusion(s): Traditional histologic dating of the endometrium has remained the gold standard for nearly 50 years.

Result(s): In 1,501 endometrial specimens, phase assignment-based integrin staining was 95% and 85% concordant with histology for the proliferative and early secretory phase, respectively, but only 54% and 49% concordant for the middle and late secretory phase, respectively.

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During the reproductive years, the cyclical hormonal changes of the menstrual cycle provide a continuously changing morphologic phenotype that is “normal.” In biopsy specimens, the combination of these cyclical changes along with artifacts and limited sampling can make normal patterns difficult to interpret.

Endometrial biopsy specimens (n = 62) were evaluated by five pathologists to assess the effect of interobserver variation on histologic dating of the endometrium. Mean (± standard error) interobserver variation was 0.96 ± 0.08 days, comparable to results reported by other investigators.

The potential effect of this variation on the diagnosis of luteal phase defects (LPDs) and resulting clinical management was also determined. The magnitude of the variation was not affected by whether the biopsy specimen was obtained in the mid or late luteal phase, the degree of lag between the dating and subsequent menses, or the presence of an LPD.

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During the reproductive years, the cyclical hormonal changes of the menstrual cycle provide a continuously changing morphologic phenotype that is “normal.” In biopsy specimens, the combination of these cyclical changes along with artifacts and limited sampling can make normal patterns difficult to interpret.Endometrial biopsy specimens (n = 62) were evaluated by five pathologists to assess the effect of interobserver variation on histologic dating of the endometrium. Mean (± standard error) interobserver variation was 0.96 ± 0.08 days, comparable to results reported by other investigators.The potential effect of this variation on the diagnosis of luteal phase defects (LPDs) and resulting clinical management was also determined. The magnitude of the variation was not affected by whether the biopsy specimen was obtained in the mid or late luteal phase, the degree of lag between the dating and subsequent menses, or the presence of an LPD.This cookie stores just a session ID; no other information is captured.Accepting the NEJM cookie is necessary to use the website.Histologic endometrial dating does not have the accuracy or the precision necessary to provide a valid method for the diagnosis of luteal phase deficiency or to otherwise guide the clinical management of women with reproductive failure.