How to prevent teen dating

06-Feb-2020 01:25

Do you know what to do if you think a teen in your life is in an abusive relationship?

February is National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month.

What are the goals of the Healthy Relationships Program? A 2009 survey conducted by Safe Futures found that in our area of Connecticut 12% of high school students have experienced physical violence in a dating relationship.

Nationally, one in three adolescents is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a figure that far exceeds rates of other types of youth violence.

In many cases, teens in abusive relationships experience severe psychological conflict which can lead to changes in their behavior.

Some warning signs to watch out for include increased levels of aggression, isolation from family and friends, and erratic mood swings.

Assist your teens in making informed choices about privacy settings and with things like de-tagging their names from photos.

Contact Arlington’s Partnership for Children and Families to see what questions they have added to the Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

While anyone can be affected by domestic violence, teens are more likely to be affected by the long-term effects of abuse: depression and anxiety, drug and alcohol addiction, suicidal tendencies, and an increased risk for victimization during college.

It can be easy to overlook some behaviors like teasing or name calling as “normal” in a relationship, but these acts can escalate to abuse or more serious forms of violence.

Our data shows that even teens from high-income, suburban, rural families get exposed to surprising amounts of violence and disorder, like drug deals and gang activity, especially if they're in middle and high school.

Talk to your teens to find out the truth about their world. Our research shows that victims of teen dating violence are three to four times as likely to be cyberbullied through Facebook, Twitter, and other social media as others.

Contact Arlington’s Partnership for Children and Families to see what questions they have added to the Youth Risk Behavior Survey.While anyone can be affected by domestic violence, teens are more likely to be affected by the long-term effects of abuse: depression and anxiety, drug and alcohol addiction, suicidal tendencies, and an increased risk for victimization during college.It can be easy to overlook some behaviors like teasing or name calling as “normal” in a relationship, but these acts can escalate to abuse or more serious forms of violence.Our data shows that even teens from high-income, suburban, rural families get exposed to surprising amounts of violence and disorder, like drug deals and gang activity, especially if they're in middle and high school.Talk to your teens to find out the truth about their world. Our research shows that victims of teen dating violence are three to four times as likely to be cyberbullied through Facebook, Twitter, and other social media as others. This program is offered to students in grades 7 through 12.